PRICE BULLINGTON
GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #88
We talked to Price Bullington, discussing his passion for gold, and his philosophies on creativity.  Hope you enjoy this read!
Could you introduce yourself?
Price Bullington, creator.
Why art, what started it all?
It’s hard to pinpoint, seeing as I always had an inclination to create since I was a child, back then I would create giant mazes made of trash in the garden, build go-karts, turn my school books into cartoons, that sort of thing. Then I lost it for a while, the “real world” killed my spirit, and other things started to dominate my existence. About 4-5 years ago it got back to me, at that point everything I made was shit though, but thanks to hard work and dedication however, I turned that shit into gold.
Who’s one artist you’ve always admired?
Francis Bacon.
Your current work has a consistent metallic theme, what’s drawn you to choose that as the majority of your subject matter?
I’m very attracted to the subtext of gold, it’s always had this elevated status as a solar metal, an object of worship in religions. Later science found out most gold is actually deposited by meteors, it also doesn’t corrode which makes it the most “evolved” of the metals. That paradoxical nature, the dance between religion and evolution, makes gold very attractive to me from a poetic standpoint.
We live in a very strange world where most of the population are superstitious, which I find both magical and tragical. What I’m trying to tickle people with, is the idea that the separation caused by gold throughout history, the lotto mentality of the gold rush, all the unfortunate side effects of this spaced out metal, are outdated and counter-productive. I think we need to look at gold the same way we need to look at mythology, as a metaphor for the highest common-denominator. We need to focus on the gold. That’s how I believe we evolve individually and as a species.
If you had to choose an artistic movement that’s the closest influence on your work, what would it be and why?
Expressionism, I believe all art at it’s core is expressionistic, all the way back to the first cave paintings 40.000 years ago, that’s what humans have done when they created something without utilitarian value, expressed themselves. There’s so much that can’t be communicated through language, and that’s where art steps in, it’s another language, and different movements are like different dialects.
When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?
I like T.S Elliot’s description of the poet’s mind when it comes to articulating how art is created. 
"The poet’s mind is in fact a receptacle for seizing and storing up numberless feelings, phrases, images, which remain there until all the particles which can unite to form a new compound are present together."
To me, life is a great adventure, and I’m an explorer trying to figure out how it all fits together. The more I experience, the more knowledge I gather, the broader my range of expression becomes.
Do you tend to multi-task when you work on your art, or complete focus? What’s your process?
My work process is a gardening of my subconscious. As my experiences and emotions bubble around, I translate them into visualizations and bring them to the surface through flow state. It’s a meditation where I don’t think conscious thoughts and operate on pure instinct. Same way evolution is not the product of conscious thought, but rather adaptation to environment.
I never know what I’m going to make, it just happens. Sometimes I’m making sculptures, which to use a music analogy, is like the lyrics in music. Other times I make backgrounds which are like the beats. When the urge strikes, I experiment with different compositions, bring the elements together. As a scientist in the lab, but without a plan, except to express myself honestly. When something feels right, it’s done.
Then it sits there, marinating.. After a while I’ll come back to it, see how it’s doing. Like natural selection, time allows me to see what’s working and adapt accordingly.
Are there any quotes you live by?
I think the concept of Amor Fati as Nietzsche formulated it, is a very powerful way of being in the world. When you can perceive risk through that spectrum, instead of the trivial fear based spectrum most people perceive risk through, you’re golden.
"What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: “This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more; and there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence—even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself. The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again, and you with it, speck of dust!
Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: “You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.” If this thought gained possession of you, it would change you as you are or perhaps crush you. The question in each and every thing, “Do you desire this once more and innumerable times more?” would lie upon your actions as the greatest weight. Or how well disposed would you have to become to yourself and to life to crave nothing more fervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal?”
- Friedrich Nietzsche
What makes you happy?
Altruism.
Any closing comments?
Enjoy life and focus on the gold.
__________
Interview by POI

PRICE BULLINGTON

GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #88

We talked to Price Bullington, discussing his passion for gold, and his philosophies on creativity.  Hope you enjoy this read!

Could you introduce yourself?

Price Bullington, creator.

Why art, what started it all?

It’s hard to pinpoint, seeing as I always had an inclination to create since I was a child, back then I would create giant mazes made of trash in the garden, build go-karts, turn my school books into cartoons, that sort of thing. Then I lost it for a while, the “real world” killed my spirit, and other things started to dominate my existence. About 4-5 years ago it got back to me, at that point everything I made was shit though, but thanks to hard work and dedication however, I turned that shit into gold.

Who’s one artist you’ve always admired?

Francis Bacon.

Your current work has a consistent metallic theme, what’s drawn you to choose that as the majority of your subject matter?

I’m very attracted to the subtext of gold, it’s always had this elevated status as a solar metal, an object of worship in religions. Later science found out most gold is actually deposited by meteors, it also doesn’t corrode which makes it the most “evolved” of the metals. That paradoxical nature, the dance between religion and evolution, makes gold very attractive to me from a poetic standpoint.

We live in a very strange world where most of the population are superstitious, which I find both magical and tragical. What I’m trying to tickle people with, is the idea that the separation caused by gold throughout history, the lotto mentality of the gold rush, all the unfortunate side effects of this spaced out metal, are outdated and counter-productive. I think we need to look at gold the same way we need to look at mythology, as a metaphor for the highest common-denominator. We need to focus on the gold. That’s how I believe we evolve individually and as a species.

If you had to choose an artistic movement that’s the closest influence on your work, what would it be and why?

Expressionism, I believe all art at it’s core is expressionistic, all the way back to the first cave paintings 40.000 years ago, that’s what humans have done when they created something without utilitarian value, expressed themselves. There’s so much that can’t be communicated through language, and that’s where art steps in, it’s another language, and different movements are like different dialects.

When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?

I like T.S Elliot’s description of the poet’s mind when it comes to articulating how art is created. 

"The poet’s mind is in fact a receptacle for seizing and storing up numberless feelings, phrases, images, which remain there until all the particles which can unite to form a new compound are present together."

To me, life is a great adventure, and I’m an explorer trying to figure out how it all fits together. The more I experience, the more knowledge I gather, the broader my range of expression becomes.

Do you tend to multi-task when you work on your art, or complete focus? What’s your process?

My work process is a gardening of my subconscious. As my experiences and emotions bubble around, I translate them into visualizations and bring them to the surface through flow state. It’s a meditation where I don’t think conscious thoughts and operate on pure instinct. Same way evolution is not the product of conscious thought, but rather adaptation to environment.

I never know what I’m going to make, it just happens. Sometimes I’m making sculptures, which to use a music analogy, is like the lyrics in music. Other times I make backgrounds which are like the beats. When the urge strikes, I experiment with different compositions, bring the elements together. As a scientist in the lab, but without a plan, except to express myself honestly. When something feels right, it’s done.

Then it sits there, marinating.. After a while I’ll come back to it, see how it’s doing. Like natural selection, time allows me to see what’s working and adapt accordingly.

Are there any quotes you live by?

I think the concept of Amor Fati as Nietzsche formulated it, is a very powerful way of being in the world. When you can perceive risk through that spectrum, instead of the trivial fear based spectrum most people perceive risk through, you’re golden.

"What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: “This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more; and there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence—even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself. The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again, and you with it, speck of dust!

Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus? Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him: “You are a god and never have I heard anything more divine.” If this thought gained possession of you, it would change you as you are or perhaps crush you. The question in each and every thing, “Do you desire this once more and innumerable times more?” would lie upon your actions as the greatest weight. Or how well disposed would you have to become to yourself and to life to crave nothing more fervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal?”

- Friedrich Nietzsche

What makes you happy?

Altruism.

Any closing comments?

Enjoy life and focus on the gold.

__________

Interview by POI

STOLEN GROUND
GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #87
Could you introduce yourself?
My name is Jean-Thomas Bouchard, I’m 25 and I live in Quebec. A few months ago I started Stolen Ground Publishing to promote zine making and publishing more accessible to some artists I like.
Who’s one artist you’ve always admired?
I don’t think I could name an artist I’ve always admired, but a while ago I discovered the work of Bill Eggleston and totally fell in love.
How would you describe your style?
I don’t think I have a style per se. I try to carry my camera with me at all times and shoot as much as possible. Anything I find that is interesting. It could be something that is happening, some architecture, a nice lighting. I know what I like and dislike so I try to stay within that range.
When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?
Most of the time it’s late at night, when I really need to sleep. I think “inspiration” comes and goes, sometimes nothing is happening for days and other times I feel like I have to do everything. I try to stay busy with as much interesting projects as I can.
How would you explain zine culture to someone who knows nothing about it?
Zines are the best! You have something to say, an opinion to share, a story to tell, stuff to show etc, put it together, print a few copies, sell them, trade them, give them. It’s such a great way to get in touch with people who share the same interests and values as you do, and that you couldn’t have got in touch with without the zines.
What inspired the zine “Matter”?
Nothing really inspired Matter. As I said, I try to carry my camera everywhere I go and shoot as much as I can, so Matter is pretty much the compilation of a few months of carrying my camera. I didn’t feel it was in the same vein as both Dead Hands (2 of my previous zines), so I gave it another name. And I’m selling it for 1$ (or trade) because I feel there are many people out there who sell overpriced shitty zines in which they didn’t put any care or effort. They sure do what they want with their stuff, but I wouldn’t have felt good with myself if people were paying 5-10-15$ for a zine that I didn’t really plan on making at first. So 1$ seemed like the logical thing to do.
Do you find that your zines have a common theme, or they take on a life of its own?
They don’t have a common theme. The 2 first DH were like my babies, I wanted to make zines for a while and thought about it for a long time (probably too long) and I wanted to make a series, but they don’t have anything in common aside from the name. When I started gathering photos for Matter, I didn’t feel like it would be a good fit for a third DH. So yeah, I’d say they take life of their own.
What can we expect to see in the future?
Hopefully more collaborations with talented artists and photographers. Help them spread their work through zines and printed goods and make it all more accessible to them. Maybe more zines of my own, I’m going on tour across Canada this fall, so lots of opportunity to shoot.
What makes you happy?
Friends, good food, beer, good music. DIY makes me happy, whether it be through music, arts, photo, design, cooking, blogging, whatever else. People who do what they love, by themselves and who believe in their thing, getting together to share their experiences or not, that makes me happy.
Any closing comments?
Thanks for the opportunity!
__________
Interviewed by POI

STOLEN GROUND

GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #87

Could you introduce yourself?

My name is Jean-Thomas Bouchard, I’m 25 and I live in Quebec. A few months ago I started Stolen Ground Publishing to promote zine making and publishing more accessible to some artists I like.

Who’s one artist you’ve always admired?

I don’t think I could name an artist I’ve always admired, but a while ago I discovered the work of Bill Eggleston and totally fell in love.

How would you describe your style?

I don’t think I have a style per se. I try to carry my camera with me at all times and shoot as much as possible. Anything I find that is interesting. It could be something that is happening, some architecture, a nice lighting. I know what I like and dislike so I try to stay within that range.

When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?

Most of the time it’s late at night, when I really need to sleep. I think “inspiration” comes and goes, sometimes nothing is happening for days and other times I feel like I have to do everything. I try to stay busy with as much interesting projects as I can.

How would you explain zine culture to someone who knows nothing about it?

Zines are the best! You have something to say, an opinion to share, a story to tell, stuff to show etc, put it together, print a few copies, sell them, trade them, give them. It’s such a great way to get in touch with people who share the same interests and values as you do, and that you couldn’t have got in touch with without the zines.

What inspired the zine “Matter”?

Nothing really inspired Matter. As I said, I try to carry my camera everywhere I go and shoot as much as I can, so Matter is pretty much the compilation of a few months of carrying my camera. I didn’t feel it was in the same vein as both Dead Hands (2 of my previous zines), so I gave it another name. And I’m selling it for 1$ (or trade) because I feel there are many people out there who sell overpriced shitty zines in which they didn’t put any care or effort. They sure do what they want with their stuff, but I wouldn’t have felt good with myself if people were paying 5-10-15$ for a zine that I didn’t really plan on making at first. So 1$ seemed like the logical thing to do.

Do you find that your zines have a common theme, or they take on a life of its own?

They don’t have a common theme. The 2 first DH were like my babies, I wanted to make zines for a while and thought about it for a long time (probably too long) and I wanted to make a series, but they don’t have anything in common aside from the name. When I started gathering photos for Matter, I didn’t feel like it would be a good fit for a third DH. So yeah, I’d say they take life of their own.

What can we expect to see in the future?

Hopefully more collaborations with talented artists and photographers. Help them spread their work through zines and printed goods and make it all more accessible to them. Maybe more zines of my own, I’m going on tour across Canada this fall, so lots of opportunity to shoot.

What makes you happy?

Friends, good food, beer, good music. DIY makes me happy, whether it be through music, arts, photo, design, cooking, blogging, whatever else. People who do what they love, by themselves and who believe in their thing, getting together to share their experiences or not, that makes me happy.

Any closing comments?

Thanks for the opportunity!

__________

Interviewed by POI

PELLEY
GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #86
Could you introduce yourself?
 My name is Tyler Pelley and I’m a 16 year old producer from Newfoundland, Canada.
What drove you to start making music?
 My earlier influences were boom bap/golden era hip hop artists and producers, but as my taste in Hip Hop expanded, artists like Spaceghostpurrp and DJ smokey and Lil Ugly mane really opened my eyes to how diverse and limitless this genre really was, so I wanted to apply my own vision/creativity to this art form to try to invent a “new sound”. In saying that, I’m still not satisfied with my music and I feel I have a long way to go before I can really say my production “stands out”.
How do you find balance while creating music, and having your personal life?
  Lately, I’ve just been chilling out and enjoying life, I find I can never “force” myself to make music, so I just do it when it feels natural.
Who are a few artists you’ve really enjoyed collaborating with?  Who can we expect to see in future collabs?
 Some being my good friends WTCHCRFT and DJ EMBE, they’re such humble guys and both very easy to work with, you can expect to see their names around more often. Also the homie Yung Xela, he’s funny as hell and is really doing something different in the game right now, there’s no doubt in my mind he’s going places. But as for future collabs, expect a lot more from the names I’ve mentioned, some people I would like to work with are: Myrror, Vaiku, BLVCSVND, CHRSBRRY, Trippy Gxd, FALCO, and many others, I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few. 
How do you feel about the increase in attention you’ve been getting on Soundcloud?
 It’s awesome, but I expected it, I’ve been speaking this into reality for a very long time and its finally paying off. But this is far from reaching my goal, I would like to give my supporters a more “real” experience in the future, maybe even some shows, but I have a lot of work to put in first.  
Can you tell us about what it’s been like being apart of FATAL FACTION?
 It’s great. We are always talking on facebook or skype, keeping up with each other. I can honestly say everyone in it is extremely talented and I think we have the most solid team on the come up right now. We really treat each other as family and we all have a say in important decisions that have to be made.
What image do you think your music conveys?
 That’s up to the listener to decide. But to me my music is just an expression of my thoughts, and that is something that would be very hard to explain.
Do you have a track of your own that holds special meaning to you?  
 My track “PP//77” is very important to me. I think that was the longest time I have ever taken on one beat.
What other goals do you have for your music this year?
 I would hope to release a project of some kind before the years out, but the date is not important to me, it just has to be perfect.
What makes you happy?
 Seeing friends and having open minded conversations with them, and really just everyday life is a blessing, I’m very lucky to be in the position I’m in now and I don’t go a day without thinking about that. 
Any closing comments?
 S/O to Hezz and Fexx, they are some fellow artists that have a very unique sound, and they are also some of the first producers I’ve ever had conversations/interactions with, they have my full support. Lastly, I would just suggest that everyone reading this would stay positive about and situations they are in and to love themselves and everyone surrounding them, also to respect the environment.
__________
Interviewed by POI

PELLEY

GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #86

Could you introduce yourself?

 My name is Tyler Pelley and I’m a 16 year old producer from Newfoundland, Canada.

What drove you to start making music?

 My earlier influences were boom bap/golden era hip hop artists and producers, but as my taste in Hip Hop expanded, artists like Spaceghostpurrp and DJ smokey and Lil Ugly mane really opened my eyes to how diverse and limitless this genre really was, so I wanted to apply my own vision/creativity to this art form to try to invent a “new sound”. In saying that, I’m still not satisfied with my music and I feel I have a long way to go before I can really say my production “stands out”.

How do you find balance while creating music, and having your personal life?

  Lately, I’ve just been chilling out and enjoying life, I find I can never “force” myself to make music, so I just do it when it feels natural.

Who are a few artists you’ve really enjoyed collaborating with?  Who can we expect to see in future collabs?

 Some being my good friends WTCHCRFT and DJ EMBE, they’re such humble guys and both very easy to work with, you can expect to see their names around more often. Also the homie Yung Xela, he’s funny as hell and is really doing something different in the game right now, there’s no doubt in my mind he’s going places. But as for future collabs, expect a lot more from the names I’ve mentioned, some people I would like to work with are: Myrror, Vaiku, BLVCSVND, CHRSBRRY, Trippy Gxd, FALCO, and many others, I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few. 

How do you feel about the increase in attention you’ve been getting on Soundcloud?

 It’s awesome, but I expected it, I’ve been speaking this into reality for a very long time and its finally paying off. But this is far from reaching my goal, I would like to give my supporters a more “real” experience in the future, maybe even some shows, but I have a lot of work to put in first.  

Can you tell us about what it’s been like being apart of FATAL FACTION?

 It’s great. We are always talking on facebook or skype, keeping up with each other. I can honestly say everyone in it is extremely talented and I think we have the most solid team on the come up right now. We really treat each other as family and we all have a say in important decisions that have to be made.

What image do you think your music conveys?

 That’s up to the listener to decide. But to me my music is just an expression of my thoughts, and that is something that would be very hard to explain.

Do you have a track of your own that holds special meaning to you?  

 My track “PP//77” is very important to me. I think that was the longest time I have ever taken on one beat.

What other goals do you have for your music this year?

 I would hope to release a project of some kind before the years out, but the date is not important to me, it just has to be perfect.

What makes you happy?

 Seeing friends and having open minded conversations with them, and really just everyday life is a blessing, I’m very lucky to be in the position I’m in now and I don’t go a day without thinking about that. 

Any closing comments?

 S/O to Hezz and Fexx, they are some fellow artists that have a very unique sound, and they are also some of the first producers I’ve ever had conversations/interactions with, they have my full support. Lastly, I would just suggest that everyone reading this would stay positive about and situations they are in and to love themselves and everyone surrounding them, also to respect the environment.

__________

Interviewed by POI

EMMA BERRY
GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #85
Could you introduce yourself?
My Name is Emma I am 17, I live in Melbourne and I am in my second to last year of high school, I drink too much coffee and spend way too much money on bagels.  Most people just call me Berry, my surname. It seems to portray me better than Emma, I have reddish hair and apparently dress like a 40 year old single father. 
Who’s one person you’ve always admired?
Keith Haring has been my favourite artist for many years now, I admire the love he had for children and educating children. His artwork seems to have always resonated with me, the idea that something so simple can be so lavish in other meanings is something I have always been bewildered about.  The way Haring approached his art and how he discussed many different social issues at the time through his reputation is something I really admire.
How would you describe your style?
I don’t think I have developed my own distinct style yet! I believe I’m still growing and developing as an “artist”. I like to settle for minimal/simple images, with colours that can feel quite calming to me and others. I find myself constantly exploring light and shadows.
When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?
I often seem to get “sparks of inspiration” after watching a film that I have admired / if I have been out all day and have experienced new things/ after visiting the gallery. 
How did your love of photography start?
I remember when I was about 6 or 7 years old, outside my bedroom window I had a little garden, one day a friend from school who was also called Emma funnily enough visited my house, we turned my little garden into a fairy garden.  I was so pleased with the garden, as soon as she left I took hundreds of photos of it on a little point and shoot digital camera, which now if I looked at the images would be very low quality, but at the time I was so pleased with them. Around the same time I had been on a little family drive and found myself taking some pictures of some souvenir didgeridoos (indigenous Australian wind instrument) , my parents would not stop making a fuss out of the image and how nice the composition was and even got it printed and framed to hang up in the house. I think that little push from my family triggered me to almost keep taking photos in my childhood. 
Do you go in search of things to photograph, or is it more spontaneous?
A bit of both, I really enjoy coming across things with no predisposed idea that I am actually going to photograph them, I like going for walks in places I am not so familiar with and finding things that seem so insignificant in the larger picture but are actually quite detailed. I have however done some “planned” shoots for a few of my Art assignments which I have also enjoyed. 
What motivated you to start creating your zine, “Tropism”?
My computer is flooded with images, I am constantly receiving  notifications telling me my start-up disk is almost full. I started my zine, “Tropism” as I realized not many of my photographs are ever in the same place at the same time, I am not in exhibitions and I don’t have my photos printed and hanging on walls, I thought it was a nice way of collecting some of my work that explore similar ideas and displaying it in a way that it is a whole, rather than just images floating around tumblr etc.  I am very interested in Zines, the history and the self publication process, and the idea that it’s more of a way to get exposure rather than earning a few dollars. 
Do you plan to produce more zines in the future?
I am currently in the middle of creating a second Issue of “Tropism”,  this time getting some friends to add some more words/poems.  I also plan on making more zines with illustrations as well as based more on social issues and ideas.
What makes you happy?
Coffee, art galleries, mountains, films and beautiful people. 
Any closing comments?
“The more I paint the more I like everything” - Jean-Michel Basquiat 
__________
Interviewed by POI

EMMA BERRY

GOLDEN BOY PRESS Interview #85

Could you introduce yourself?

My Name is Emma I am 17, I live in Melbourne and I am in my second to last year of high school, I drink too much coffee and spend way too much money on bagels.  Most people just call me Berry, my surname. It seems to portray me better than Emma, I have reddish hair and apparently dress like a 40 year old single father. 

Who’s one person you’ve always admired?

Keith Haring has been my favourite artist for many years now, I admire the love he had for children and educating children. His artwork seems to have always resonated with me, the idea that something so simple can be so lavish in other meanings is something I have always been bewildered about.  The way Haring approached his art and how he discussed many different social issues at the time through his reputation is something I really admire.

How would you describe your style?

I don’t think I have developed my own distinct style yet! I believe I’m still growing and developing as an “artist”. I like to settle for minimal/simple images, with colours that can feel quite calming to me and others. I find myself constantly exploring light and shadows.

When do you typically have sparks of inspiration?

I often seem to get “sparks of inspiration” after watching a film that I have admired / if I have been out all day and have experienced new things/ after visiting the gallery. 

How did your love of photography start?

I remember when I was about 6 or 7 years old, outside my bedroom window I had a little garden, one day a friend from school who was also called Emma funnily enough visited my house, we turned my little garden into a fairy garden.  I was so pleased with the garden, as soon as she left I took hundreds of photos of it on a little point and shoot digital camera, which now if I looked at the images would be very low quality, but at the time I was so pleased with them. Around the same time I had been on a little family drive and found myself taking some pictures of some souvenir didgeridoos (indigenous Australian wind instrument) , my parents would not stop making a fuss out of the image and how nice the composition was and even got it printed and framed to hang up in the house. I think that little push from my family triggered me to almost keep taking photos in my childhood. 

Do you go in search of things to photograph, or is it more spontaneous?

A bit of both, I really enjoy coming across things with no predisposed idea that I am actually going to photograph them, I like going for walks in places I am not so familiar with and finding things that seem so insignificant in the larger picture but are actually quite detailed. I have however done some “planned” shoots for a few of my Art assignments which I have also enjoyed. 

What motivated you to start creating your zine, “Tropism”?

My computer is flooded with images, I am constantly receiving  notifications telling me my start-up disk is almost full. I started my zine, “Tropism” as I realized not many of my photographs are ever in the same place at the same time, I am not in exhibitions and I don’t have my photos printed and hanging on walls, I thought it was a nice way of collecting some of my work that explore similar ideas and displaying it in a way that it is a whole, rather than just images floating around tumblr etc.  I am very interested in Zines, the history and the self publication process, and the idea that it’s more of a way to get exposure rather than earning a few dollars. 

Do you plan to produce more zines in the future?

I am currently in the middle of creating a second Issue of “Tropism”,  this time getting some friends to add some more words/poems.  I also plan on making more zines with illustrations as well as based more on social issues and ideas.

What makes you happy?

Coffee, art galleries, mountains, films and beautiful people. 

Any closing comments?

“The more I paint the more I like everything” - Jean-Michel Basquiat 

__________

Interviewed by POI